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Daniel P. Lopresti

   Interim Dean, P.C. Rossin College
       of Engineering and Applied Science

   Professor, Department of
       Computer Science and Engineering


Lehigh University
19 Memorial Drive West
Bethlehem, PA  18015-3084  USA
Phone:  
(610) 758-5308
Fax:  
(610) 758-5623
Email*:  


Office:  
Packard Lab 308
photo

Daniel Lopresti received his bachelor's degree from Dartmouth in 1982 and his Ph.D. in computer science from Princeton in 1987. After completing his doctorate, he joined the Department of Computer Science at Brown and taught courses ranging from VLSI design to computational aspects of molecular biology and conducted research in parallel computing and VLSI CAD. He went on to help found the Matsushita Information Technology Laboratory in Princeton, and later also served on the research staff at Bell Labs where his work turned to document analysis, handwriting recognition, and biometric security.

In 2003, Dr. Lopresti joined the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Lehigh where his research examines fundamental algorithmic and systems-related questions in pattern recognition, bioinformatics, and security. Dr. Lopresti is director of the Lehigh Pattern Recognition Research (PatRec) Lab. On July 1, 2009, he became Chair of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Effective July 1, 2014, he assumed the role of Interim Dean of the P. C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science at Lehigh.

Recent News of Note
Mountaintop Experiential Learning Environment
I have had significant involvement in the development of Lehigh's new Mountaintop Project. For coverage of this activity, which began in Summer 2013 and continues to grow in size and scope, click here.
New Paradigm for Pattern Recognition Research
We are investigating a fundamentally new approach to conducting experimental pattern recognition research. Based on advances made possible by Web 2.0 technologies, our vision addresses a number of serious issues with the status quo, including overreliance on small standard datasets, implicit bias in testing, and irreproducibility of experimental results. For more details on this idea which we call "DARE," click here.
Document Analysis and Exploitation
We have had an active research effort in the area of document analysis and exploitation for several years now. Much of this work has been conducted in collaboration with colleagues at BBN Technologies with funding from DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Henry Baird and I were principal investigators, but congressional funding we received expanded the project to include other colleagues, including Hank Korth. To read a news article about the award, click here.
Electronic Voting
I serve as an independent expert in the Banfield v. Cortés lawsuit challenging the use of certain electronic voting machines in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Click here to learn more about the case, which has been in progress for several years now.

A recent ruling by the judge in the case has set the stage for independent examination of Pennsylvania's e-voting systems. The details are now being worked out by parties from both sides.

The PERFECT Project

We recently wrapped up a modest NSF CyberTrust grant to study issues surrounding the reliable processing of voting records, including paper ballots. Investigators on the project included George Nagy from RPI, Elisa Barney Smith from Boise State, Chris Borick from Muhlenberg, and Ziad Munson and myself from Lehigh. PERFECT is an acronym that stands for "Paper and Electronic Records For Elections: Cultivating Trust." Click here for the PERFECT project website.

For access to an important new collection of scanned ballot images from a real election, click here.

We have acquired examples of two full-face electronic voting systems manufactured by Danaher and Sequoia. These systems match those used in several PA counties, and were purchased from government surplus auctions on the web. For more information and media coverage, click below:
For other past news on the e-voting issue, click here.
Bioinformatics
Greg Lang from Biological Sciences and I will be leading a team of student researchers in a 2014 Biosystems Dynamics Summer Institute project. The topic of the project is "Identification of Driver Mutations in Experimental Evolution" and derives from Greg's ongoing reseaerch. The Lehigh BDSI is  funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI).

* My email address is expressed in image format to make it more difficult for "bots" to harvest it for spam purposes.


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© 2004 P.C. Rossin College of Engineering & Applied Science
Computer Science & Engineering, Packard Laboratory, Lehigh University, Bethlehem PA 18015